SO WHAT IS A FLEA CIRCUS?

                                                 

A flea circus is a real circus but in miniature, "fleas" use tiny props to carry 
out all the acts within the circus. 

The history of the Flea Circus dates back to Egyptian and Roman times but was most
successful during the 1600s onwards when these fascinating little shows were 
exhibited from small boxes or trunks in pubs, taverns and fairs.

Most Flea Circuses died out well before the 1940s and today there are very few left.

Fleas would be
harnessed
using a very fine wire which is tied around the fleas neck
to make a tiny collar, this is usually made
from jewelers very thin gold wire. 
Sometimes jewellers or watch makers were
set the task of creating the miniature 
chariots and props for the fleas to use.
(We make all our own chariots and props).

The most popular acts through the years might include.....


Chariots and 'horse drawn' style carts that are pulled by a flea.
High dive - the flea dives from a diving board into a pool of water.
High wire - the flea crawls across the wire to the other side with a prop.
Sea-saw - the fleas ride the sea-saw.
Trapeze - the fleas jump from swing to swing.
A flea kicks a football.
Flea cannon - a flea is shot from the cannon.
Svensons are at the top of the Flea Circus tradition, we are experts in our craft
and are passionate about our "fleas".
Everyone has heard of the Flea Circus but few have actually seen one, it's a
show everyone always remembers!


 

 

mrjollandcigandbox          SOME FLEA FACTS

   A flea can pull up to 160,000 times its own weight!

   A flea can lift up to 60 times its own weight!

   A flea can jump over 150 times its own hight! If a

   man had the same strength he could jump over

   St Paul's Cathedral.
  When jumping, the flea accelerates 50 times

  faster than the space shuttle!

  And a flea can jump 30000 times without stopping! 

                       

  






Mr Jolly with a cigar box flea circus.

 

 

                                             

 

 

 

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